Performances of early electronic music.

 

These works were created in the San Francisco State College Electronic Music Lab during the 1968 and 69 student anti-Vietnam War protests. On an almost daily basis the protesters (many not students) would arrive on campus in the morning, by noon the police would arrive and the campus would be closed. I was able to hide in the Electronic Music Lab and continue to work even though the campus was closed. The works created while might be considered anti-war pieces they were in reality protesting the protesters.

They Call It a Revolution
Unknown Track - Unknown Artist
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They Call It a Revolution is the first of three pieces inspired by the anti-war demonstrations at San Francisco State College in 1968 and 1969.  It was the first year of the existence of  the Electronic Music Lab in the music department. In it's beginning stages the lab contained  a Buchla Synthesizer and 3 monoral reel-to-reel tape decks. Predating rap by several decades the piece uses rhythmic speech done by the composer.

Tap loops and multiple-overdubb recordings were some of the techniques used in the production.

The Cause
Unknown Track - Unknown Artist
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Give Me Peace at Any Price
Unknown Track - Unknown Artist
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The vocal parts of Give Me Peace at Any Price, like those of The Cause were taken from improvised recordings of the three vocal students at S.F. State College.

Electronic Dance Suite

The Electronic Dance Suite also created at the San Francisco lab contains six movements: 1. Prelude 2. Allemande 3. Courante 4. Hormpipe 5. Aria and 6. Gigue

The voice parts for The Cause were taken from recordings of three San Francisco State vocal students improvising with words given to them  by the composer. Specifically chosen sections of the recordings were spliced into useable sequences. Tape loops and retrograde versions were then overdubed with recordings of Buchla sound events. 

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